Devotion and Pilgrimage
Pilgrimage
Concepts and decorations used in places of pilgrimage spread widely throughout the surrounding area and influenced local culture.
The glory of some pilgrim destinations spread far beyond the region in which it was sited. In a period when servitude was commonplace, pilgrimage was seen as an opportunity for common people to leave their own domain, and to this day, places of pilgrimage are important meeting points for the people from different countries and social groups. Concepts and decorations used in places of pilgrimage spread widely throughout the surrounding area and influenced local culture. Some places of pilgrimage arose as votive gifts from the aristocracy and were then used as the burial place of the patron as it was thought that interment near the miraculous image guaranteed an afterlife of eternal glory.
Pilgrimage Church of the Scourged Saviour in Wies

1745–1749: choir and Priory building; 1750–1754: lay church; 1756/57: side altars and organ
Steingaden-Wies, Upper Bavaria, Germany
Architecture, stuccowork and main altar: Dominikus Zimmermann (1685–1766); stucco design and ceiling frescos: Johann Baptist Zimmermann (1680–1758); altarpiece: Balthasar Augustin Albrecht (1687–1765); side altars: Dominikus Bergmüller from Türkheim (1707–1773); sculptures in the choir: Ägid Verhelst (1696–1749); sculptures in the lay church: Franz Anton Sturm (1690–1757)
A famous site of pilgrimage in southern Bavaria and of great importance in Central Europe. Pilgrimage, the monasterys activities and its connections all make this an important meeting point for people of all social classes.