Languages of Baroque
Illusion, gesture and movement
The art of quadratura developed for the sake of more dazzling and persuasive visual spectacles and spiritual experiences.
The theatrical character of the Baroque and its imitative inclination allowed painting to compete with architecture in the field of illusionist painting. The art of quadratura developed for the sake of more dazzling and persuasive visual spectacles and spiritual experiences. Elaborate foreshortenings of painted architecture, carefully designed and created to enhance real architectural space, developed the quattrocento (15th-century) concept known as di sotto in sù, (lit. seen from below), which was first introduced by Melozzo da Forli and Andrea Mantegna. Optical illusion was inherent not only to painting, but “is in fact amongst the most characteristic devices of Baroque architecture” as well. (Pevsner, 1943).
Sant'Andrea della Valle, Glory of the Virgin fresco

1625–1627
Rome, Italy
Giovanni Lanfranco
Lanfrancos masterpiece Assumption of the Virgin was inspired by Correggios Proto-Baroque dome-fresco depicting the same theme, which was executed between 1526 and 1530 in Parma Cathedral. The vortex of figures is unique in the art of 17th-century Rome.